August 26, 2014

US Law Professors of EU Law: Additional Information Regarding Student Internship Opportunity at US Mission to the EU in Brussels

In response to his initial post regarding this opportunity, Kenneth Propp, Legal Counselor to the United States Mission to the European Union, has forwarded the following additional information:

Thank you for the interest many of you have expressed regarding the legal internship offered through the US Mission to the European Union in Brussels, Belgium.  I would like to clarify several questions that have been raised about the position.

·         The position is located in the US Mission to the EU,  in Brussels, Belgium, specifically in the Mission’s Executive Office, which consists of the Ambassador, deputy chief of Mission, and legal counselor, among others.  The selectee would work on projects generated by the Ambassador and legal counselor.

·         We offer this internship opportunity three times a year, in the fall (beginning September), winter (beginning in January) and summer (beginning in May-June) for a term of ten weeks.  Thus it is a good opportunity for students who are interested in spending a semester abroad as well as for those looking for summer employment.  There is some limited flexibility on starting dates.

·         The internship is an unpaid position. We appreciate that this can be a hardship for students, but fortunately many are able to obtain funding from their law schools or other institutional resources to enable their participation.

·         The link regarding the internship on the U.S. Mission’s website (http://useu.usmission.gov/internships4.html)redirects potential applicants to a link on the U.S. Department of State website (http://careers.state.gov/intern/student-internships) for applications to the larger State Department internship program.  This is because the selection process for the Brussels position examines only those applications submitted through the State Department internship program as a whole.

·         As several have noted, the State Department student internship program currently is not accepting applications.  Applications next will be accepted beginning in approximately mid-October, for internships during the summer of 2015.  It will remain open only for a number of weeks thereafter.  The selection process for the summer position then will occur over the next several months.  The US Mission will conduct telephone interviews with a handful of top candidates.

·         The candidate selected through this process for the internship then must undergo a security clearance process, which can require several months, hence the need for the long lead time for applications.

·         Your students who are interested in applying for the summer 2015 cycle should place their names on an email distribution list (http://careers.state.gov/intern/student-internships) in order to be notified specifically when the short window for applications will open in October.

·         The only application materials are those required for the larger State Department internship program.  A CV, summary of academic record, and personal statement are the main features.  We look closely at all these elements, concentrating on legal background, especially in international and European law, grades, and quality of writing.  Applicants interested in the Brussels legal internship should specifically so indicate in their application through the State Department program.

·         Unfortunately, because of volume, we discourage potential applicants from contacting the US Mission directly with further questions about the program.

I wish the process were less cumbersome and bureaucratic, but we must operate within U.S. Government constraints.

I hope this further information is helpful.  Please circulate as appropriate.

Kenneth R. Propp
Legal Counselor
United States Mission to the European Union

August 25, 2014

Book Announcement: Risk Governance of Offshore Oil and Gas Operations (Hempel Lindøe, Baram, and Renn, eds.)



Network member Michael Baram (BU) has asked us to alert the network to not one but two recent collective volumes on the topic of risk and governance of which he is the co-editor.  The first is Governing Risk in GM Agriculture, and the second is Risk Governance of Offshore Oil and Gas Operations, both from Cambridge.  The publisher's overview for the latter and more recent book is below, and more information can be found on the Cambridge site here.


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This book evaluates and compares risk regulation and safety management for offshore oil and gas operations in the United States, United Kingdom, Norway, and Australia. It provides an interdisciplinary approach with legal, technological, and sociological perspectives on their efforts to assess and prevent major accidents and improve safety performance offshore. Presented in three parts, the volume begins with a review of the technical, legal, behavioral, and sociological factors involved in designing, implementing, and enforcing a regulatory regime for industrial safety. It then evaluates the four regulatory regimes that encompass the cultural, legal, and other contextual factors that influence their design and implementation, along with their reliance on industrial expertise and standards and the use of performance indicators. The final section presents an assessment of the resilience of the Norwegian regime and its capacity to keep pace with new technologies and emerging risks, respond to near miss incidents, encourage safety culture, incorporate vested rights of labor, and perform inspection and self-audit functions. This book is highly relevant for those in government, business, academia, and elsewhere in civil society who are involved in offshore safety issues, including regulatory authorities and industrial safety professionals.

August 20, 2014

US Law Professors of EU Law: Internship Opportunity for Your Students at the US Mission to the EU in Brussels

Kenneth Propp, Legal Counsellor to the United States Mission to the European Union, has passed on the note below, which we are pleased to forward to the network.


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With the advent of the new academic year, I would be grateful if you would again bring to the attention of your students and your career offices a legal internship offered through the US Mission to theEuropean Union

The U.S. Mission to the European Union, where I serve as legal counselor, offers an internship for U.S. law students interested in European Union and public international law.   The intern, under my supervision, analyzes and report on cases in the European Court of Justice relevant to U.S. Government interests, as well as more broadly observe and report on other legal developments relating to the EU institutions, particularly in the field of Justice and Home Affairs.   The intern also would undertake research, and prepare briefing materials and public remarks, for the U.S. Ambassador to the EU, thus gaining as well first-hand exposure to the breadth of the Mission’s diplomatic activities.

The Mission’s website provides details on the legal internship, as well as a link to the State Department’s application process.  To access it, visit

About Us (pull down tab)

Only U.S. citizens may apply, and successful applicants must receive a security clearance.   Interns typically serve for ten week terms, throughout the year.  Applicants for a 2015 summer position need to apply by early in the fall of this year.  State Department internship positions are unpaid, but some logistical and administrative support is provided. 

Please encourage promising students to consider this opportunity, and feel free to contact me directly if you have any questions.  Thanks for your help.

Legal Counselor
United States Mission to the European Union

August 17, 2014

Special Issue of the German Law Journal -- "EU Citizenship: Twenty Years On"

Network member Russell Miller (W&L, also Editor-in-Chief of the German Law Journal)has passed on the announcement of a special issue entitled "EU Citizenship: Twenty Years On," edited by Patricia Mindus (Uppsala).  The announcement is below and the issues contents can be found here.

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What does it mean to be a citizen of the European Union?  The question cuts right to the heart of the project of re-locating state authority at level of the supranational European Union.

On one hand, the dream seems to have failed to capture the European imagination.  The World Cup's old national rivalries and the opaque voting patterns that play-out each year at the Eurovision Song Contest tell the story of a stubborn identification with the nation state.  European Union leaders were relieved to see that voter turnout in last spring's European election did not follow the decades-old trend of declines.  But turnout held steady at a mere 43%, leaving Guy Verhofstadt to celebrate the fact that “We have finally broken the downward trend of falling participation in European elections."

On the other hand, European citizenship resonates in its way, as any of us who wearily queue in the long, slow-moving "All Nationalities" or "All Other Passport" lines at European airports know all too well.  And the Internet is bursting with offers to sell EU citizenship for the pricy sum of GBP 150,000 (the market seems to be most active in Malta and Bulgaria).

Patricia Mindus of Uppsala University has assembled a special issue on European Citizenship - marking the 20th anniversary of the introduction of the concept in the Maastricht Treaty - that treats the question in all its complexity.  Prof. Mindus explains that "Much has happened in and across the EU since Union citizenship was first introduced. Though many question its value, few advocate its irrelevance. This special issue takes stock of how EU citizenship has evolved over the last two decades and what ideas it conveys into the future."  The German Law Journal is very pleased to publish this impressive collection.